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Professor Saurabh Sinha, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Research and Internationalisation, University of Johannesburg, invites you to the UJ Postgraduate School Spring Seminar Series

At the four seminars there will be presentations from distinguished visiting professors who are acknowledged experts on aspects of postgraduate education.


18 October 2018    (2pm – 4pm)
The internationalisation of higher education scrutinised: insights, issues and imperatives
Professor Jane Knight , University of Toronto, Canada
Distinguished Visiting Professor, University of Johannesburg 
In association with the Ali Mazrui Centre for Higher Education Studies (UJ)

Professor Jane Knight of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto and Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Johannesburg, focuses her research on the international dimension of higher education at the institutional, national, regional and international levels. Her work in over 70 countries brings a comparative, development and international perspective to her research, teaching and policy work. She is the author of numerous publications and sits on the advisory boards of several international organizations, universities, and journals. She is the recipient of several international awards and two honorary doctorates for her contribution to higher education.

Abstract:
Few would question that internationalization has dramatically changed higher education in the last three decades; but many might ask whether it is for better or worse. Internationalization rationales, strategies, policies, priorities, outcomes and impacts differ between and among different actors, stakeholders, institutions, countries and regions of the world. This presentation takes a hard look at current trends, new developments, and unintended consequences of internationalization. Special attention is given to the growth in international education hubs and the international mobility of programs and providers in the form of international joint/binational universities, double/joint degree programs, franchise arrangements, and international branch campuses. In this increasingly complex and interdependent world in which we live it is imperative that the higher education sector examine the twists and turns, benefits and risks, and new opportunities in the evolution of higher education internationalization.

To register for this seminar please email:
Lerato Diale:  leratod@uj.ac.za
Loria Mokoena: loriam@uj.ac.za



26 October 2018    (2pm – 4pm)
Repoliticisation of the university 
Professor Imanol Odororika, National University of Mexico (UNAM), Mexico 
Distinguished Visiting Professor, University of Johannesburg 
In association with the Ali Mazrui Centre for Higher Education Studies (UJ)

Imanol Ordorika (Ph. D. Stanford, 1999) is professor of social sciences and education at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Currently, he is General Director for Institutional Assessment at UNAM and creator of the online Comparative Study of Mexican Universities. Author of Power and Politics in University Governance (2003) and coeditor of the ASHE reader Compartive Education (2010) and the book Universities and the Public Sphere (2011). Other recent publications are chapters (Ordorika Rodríguez and Lloyd, 218) “Federalism and higher education in Mexico,” in Carnoy, M., Froumin, I., Leshukov, O. y Marginson, S. (coords.), Federalism and Higher Education: A Comparative Study, (Ordorika, 2017) “Knowledge and Change in Contemporary Postcolonial Universities,” in Michael Cross and Amasa Ndofirepi. (coords.), Knowledge and Change in African Universities, and (Ordorika and Lloyd, 2015) “Critical Theories of the State and Contest in Higher Education in the Globalized Era,” in Martínez-Alemán, A., Bensimon, E. y Pusser, B. (eds.), Critical Approaches to the Study of Higher Education: a Practical Introduction; as well as academic articles (Ordorika and Lloyd, 2015) “International rankings and the contest for university hegemony”, in Journal of Education Policy, (Ordorika, 2018) “The Academic Publishing Trap,” in Revista Española de Pedagogía. Ordorika has been awarded the Chaire d’Études Mexicaines Alfonso Reyes at the Institut des Hautes Etudes de l'Amérique Latine (IHEAL), Université PARIS III – Sorbonne Nouvelle. Paris, France, the Frank Talbott Jr. University Chair (Cátedra Universitaria Frank Talbott Jr.) University of Virginia. Charlottesville, Virginia,US, and more recently appointed Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Johannesburg.

To register for this seminar please email:
Lerato Diale:  leratod@uj.ac.za
Loria Mokoena: loriam@uj.ac.za




2 November 2018    (2pm – 4pm)
Decolonising the curriculum: reflections on transforming doctoral education through southern higher education research 
Professor Catherine Manathunga, University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia
In association with the Johannesburg Institute of Advanced Study

Professor Catherine Manathunga (PhD) is a Professor of Education Research in the School of Education at The University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia. She is an historian who draws together expertise in historical, sociological and cultural studies research to bring an innovative perspective to educational research, particularly focusing on the higher education sector. Catherine has current research projects on doctoral education; the history of universities in Ireland, Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand and academic identities. Her book, Intercultural Postgraduate Supervision: Reimagining time, place and knowledge, was published in June 2014 by Routledge. Catherine has also co-authored monograph on educational history, A class of its own: a history of Queensland University of Technology; co-edited an oral history monograph, Making a place: an oral history of academic development in Australia; and has published over 83 peer-reviewed book chapters and journal articles in international edited collections and international, Australian, Irish, American and British journals. Her research has been funded by the Australian Research Council, DFAT Australia China Council, Australian Learning and Teaching Council, Ako Aotearoa (NZ Centre for Tertiary Education), Higher Education Research & Development Society of Australasia, Nagoya University Japan, Hiroshima University Japan and industry partners. She has jointly won a number of University of Queensland and Australian national teaching awards for programs that enhance research students’ learning. She has acted as an educational consultant to many other universities in Australia and internationally.

Abstract:
Decolonising the curriculum: reflections on transforming doctoral education through Southern higher education research While calls to decolonise the curriculum have been occurring for decades particularly through postcolonial, feminist and Indigenous research, universities even in the global South remain very slow to draw upon this research to actively work to transform doctoral education and teaching and learning. Indeed, the recent domination of university cultures by neoliberal and globalising capitalism has made this mission even more challenging. Global inequities in knowledge production continue to become further entrenched and Northern knowledge systems seem to be becoming more dominant (Peters, 2015; Connell, 2017; Connell et al., 2017) . The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is a key site where contested postcolonial histories, geographies and epistemologies play out sometimes in quite dangerous ways. Therefore, we need to draw upon a robust array of theoretical resources if we are to decolonise the curriculum and create spaces for Southern research to flourish, for research-based quality teaching and learning and for universities to engage in effective community engagement with all of the ethnic communities represented in our postcolonial local and national contexts. In this keynote presentation, I outline the postcolonial/decolonial theoretical framework I draw upon to explore a series of key strategies to decolonise the curriculum (Manathunga, 2018). I will interrogate each of these strategies further, seeking practical examples from a range of Southern locations. I will conclude by inviting the audience to debate further how genuine decolonisation of the curriculum might be achieved in their own disciplines and universities.

To register for this seminar please email:
Lerato Diale:  leratod@uj.ac.za



9 November 2018    (2pm – 4pm)
Opportunities and challenges in graduate education: the next decade 
Dr Suzanne Ortega, President, Council of Graduate Schools, Washington DC, USA

Suzanne Ortega became the sixth President of the Council of Graduate Schools on July 1, 2014. Prior to assuming her current position, she served as the University of North Carolina (UNC) Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs (2011-14). Previous appointments include the Executive Vice President and Provost at the University of New Mexico, Vice Provost and Graduate Dean at the University of Washington, and the University of Missouri. Dr. Ortega's masters and doctoral degrees in sociology were completed at Vanderbilt University.

To register for this seminar please email:
Lerato Diale:  leratod@uj.ac.za