Department of Psychology Department of Psychology

Department of Psychology

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Department of Psychology

The University of Johannesburg strives to be an international university of choice, anchored in Africa, dynamically shaping the future.  The UJ mission is to inspire its community to transform and serve humanity through innovation and the collaborative pursuit of knowledge. The UJ Psychology department draws inspiration from its location in the cosmopolitan city of Johannesburg.  UJ Psychology places emphasis on positive functioning, wellbeing and health promotion in the city.   The department offers training at the undergraduate and honours level, which extends into professional training of the Masters clinical and counselling programmes and it includes a diverse programme in research Psychology. The department also hosts an active doctoral and postdoctoral programme.

The department is proud of its alumni boasting several high profile South Africans in business, academia and civil society. The curriculum is inclusive of established psychology theory as well as African centred and local epistemologies to provide a contextualised curriculum, while still being internationally relevant. The department has an increasing pan African and global footprint with collaborations in a number of countries.

Vision Statement

The Department of Psychology strives for excellence in teaching, research, professional training and community engagement, both nationally and internationally within its location in the Faculty of Humanities, the University of Johannesburg and the broader African urban context.

We aim to achieve this by: 

  • Offering students an outstanding education in the discipline and profession of psychology that prepares them to deal with challenges and opportunities at all levels of society as well as on the personal, interpersonal and psychological levels of existence; 
  • Facilitating the development of a management structure within the Department that is characterized by democracy, transparency, respect and accountability; 
  • Encouraging members of staff in their career development through the mobilization of resources, providing a supportive infrastructure to promote high-quality, peer-reviewed research and its publication, as well as supporting staff to attend relevant academic conferences and workshops;
  • Developing a culture of first-rate scholarship and learning for both staff and students and the establishment of excellent teaching practice and productive student-staff relationships; 
  • Positioning the Department as a member of a world class African University within a world class city that seeks to support staff and students to engage with local communities through research, teaching, skills development and various programme implementation activities; 
  • Positioning the Department as a non-discriminatory organization that attracts top quality staff and students; 
  • Undertaking to increase the national and international reputation of the Department and the University by collaborating with international academics and professionals in teaching and research;
  • Pursuing appropriate policies that promote the development of a Department that seeks to maintain a social, ethical and political responsibility towards the growth of the discipline of Psychology

**Please note**

  • Before registration for a PhD in Psychology you must first have an agreement between you and a supervisor in the Department of Psychology who has agreed to supervise you. If not, you cannot register until you have a supervisor.  Information about this process, as well as entrance requirements, and other information, are on the Psychology Departmental website.  Please visit this website before applying.   


Call for papers (SAHUDA-NIHSS Conference 2019) 

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Call for Papers

'Time, Thought and Materiality and the Fourth Industrial Revolution'

2019 SAHUDA-NIHSS Conference 2019

3-4 September 2019

University of Johannesburg, South Africa

Organized by the UJ Faculty of Humanities

Across global society a diversity of new technologies – disruptive, constraining and enabling in complex ways - are changing not only the ways that we live, love and work, but the very conceptual tools through which we understand human (co) existence in and with the world. For many the culmination of the diverse political and socio-economic implications of these technological changes, and the epistemological and even ontological implications they carry, amount to something greater; that we are entering a Fourth Industrial Revolution, or 4IR. For many, this revolution is potentially 'time defining'. That is, its transformative potential may come to define an age of human existence, much like the notion of the 'anthropocene' has come to constitute a particular temporal epoch (one that is perhaps the other side of the 4IR coin and is certainly not an unrelated phenomena or concept). Like this sibling notion, 4IR has begun to acquire wider cultural and political capital, and intellectual traction, beyond the niche circles of engineers, technicians and policy buffs from where it first came. In 2016, the World Economic Forum defined 4IR as consisting of those "technological developments that blur the lines between the physical, digital and biological spheres…it integrates cyber-physical systems and the Internet of Things, big data and cloud computing, robotics and artificial intelligence-based systems". It is still too early to judge whether we are indeed in the early phases of yet another industrial revolution, although something like a consensus is emerging. But what is clear is that new technologies, and the apparent accelerating pace of technological change, is reshaping our political, ecological, and social environments in profound ways; shaping new ways of living, working and dying, and new forms of knowing, thinking and existence. These changes at once inspire both techno-optimism and techno-pessimism. They create both opportunities for better lives, governance and equality, and risk deepening existing exclusions, inequalities and precarity. Just as the any consensus about 4IR remains contested and emergent, so these verdicts remain uncertain: full of danger and opportunity in equal, undecided, measures.

In this context it becomes particularly urgent for the humanities to become part of the conversation around the 4IR. The stakes are simply to high – for good or for ill (and everything in between) – for this discussion to be left to the natural sciences. More to the point, the new frames of knowing and being that the 4IR provokes, collapse conventional distinctions between different arms of the intellectual activity in academy. The humanities are already involved in 4IR, like it or not, and so this conference seeks to explore what forms that involvement in 4IR can and should be, and has already taken. We ask how the humanities are already part of this revolution, if that is what it is, and what roles they should play to shape it in a way that avoid the pitfalls of extreme inequality, exclusion and precarity that previous industrial revolutions engendered. The theme for this 2019 SAHUDA conference is therefore "Time, Thought and Materiality in the Fourth Industrial Revolution' to reflect, firstly, how 4IR embodies profound temporal propositions, even as it is also often understood to effect a speeding up of time and a compression of space. And secondly, because at its conceptual core lies an attempt to reconceptualise how thinking and doing, meaning and matter, existence and understanding are relationally constituted and mutually dependent. Our focus on the "Fourth Industrial Revolution" is therefore not intended to constrain intellectual engagement, but rather, interpreted imaginatively, to foster new forms of analysis and scholarly collaboration around what the consequences might be of the self-evident acceleration of 'technologically advancement' on human conditions and existence in and with the world.

The conference will cover the following seven themes:


Student Panel

If you are interested in submitting a paper for one of these themes, please contact Dr Dawn Nagar (dawnn@uj.ac.za) the conference coordinator directly.

The deadline for the submission of paper proposals is 20 April 2019. All proposals should include: 1) Proposed paper title, 2) Author name(s) and contact information, 3) Author affiliation(s) and position(s), 3) A 100-200 word abstract and 4) The name of the panel for which the paper is being proposed.